Completion of My Visit to the 13 Municipalities of Timor-Leste (Part 3)

By: VZ from Dili, Timor-Leste.

Passing by Balibo, Balibo post-administrative, Bobonaro, 2013

10. Maliana- Bobonaro Municipality

I first time came to Maliana city in 2013 for a field and the beautiful view of the municipality was my bonus to enjoy. Today, Bobonaro is the municipality though it was formerly one of the district. The word is a Portuguese modified word of the Tetun language word Bobonaru (or Buburnaru), which means “tall eucalypt”. Geographically, the municipality located at the southwest of the country and has the Savu Sea to the north of Bobonaro, the municipality of Liquiçá to the northeast, Ermera to the east, Ainaro to the southeast, and Cova-Lima to the south. To the west lies the Indonesian province Nusa Tenggara Timur. Batugade is where the portal of the border with Indonesia is located and many Timorese usually travel to West Timor through this border. Sometimes, dolphins appeared around the beach of Batugade. Bekais, Kemak and Bunak are main dialects with Indonesia and Tetun are widely understood. Agriculture activity is productive sector in this municipality which is known for its high local rice plantation and also the local restaurant also serve the local rice to its consumers which is quite unique thing in this municipality. Entering the municipality, I was intrigued to see Balibo, a spot area where the incident of killing of Australian journalists group happened during early Indonesian occupation 1975 and the incident is popularly known as Balibo Five. Other popular spot to visit is Natural Hot Spring in Marobo (which I did not able to make) and Maliana also has interesting cultural local context to discover. It took four to five hours trip to reach Maliana from Dili with car or public bus.

Railaco street, Ermera., 2018

11. Ermera- Ermera Municipality

Ermera is one of the closer municipality to Dili located in the west-central part of the country. It is regarded as the coffee producer municipality in Timor-Leste due to its major production and plantation of coffee which has been available in Ermera since Portuguese time. My first touch with this municipality was on my field trip to Railaco and Gleno, two post administrative to reach before entering the Ermera city. Departing from Dili, one has to pass by Liquica municipality before reaching Ermera. The word Ermera according local folktale means ‘red water’ in Mambae language. It is one of land-locked municipalities in East Timor with Aileu. It borders Liquiçá to the north, Dili to the northeast, Alieu to the east, Ainaro to the southeast, and Bobonaro to the west. Mambae is the main dialect with Tetun and Indonesia are widely understood. The road today is curvy and well paved from Tibar to Gleno. One can definitely made a one day trip to Gleno and enjoy the lush green trees along the way and seeing the coffee plantations when passing by the Railaco street. Ermera has 5 post administrative such as Ermera, Atsabe, Hatulia, Letefoho and Railaco. There are many unexposed tourism site in Ermera and local cultures and traditions are also interesting to discover. It took 1 to 2 hour day trip with car or public bus from Dili to Ermera.

Maubara beach, Liquica, 2015

12. Liquiça – Liquiça Municipality

As one of the closest municipality to Dili, Liquiça has become the one popular destination to visit for a one day trip from Dili. It is located on the northern coast of East Timor, and borders the municipalities of Dili  to the east, Aileu to the Southeast, Ermera to the south, and Bobonaro to the southwest. To the northwest with Savu Sea. What I noticed most about this municipality is the beaches and its black sand along the way from Dili. The popular beaches in this municipality is Maubara beach with the former Portuguese Fort, the Black Rock beach and Lauhata beach. Maubara has many significant historical documentaries since Portuguese time and during 1999 crisis to be explored and retold by the local people. Aipelu prison is one of popular spot to see the remarks of Portuguese presence in the past. Some people loves to do diving in its beaches. Along with beaches, one can also purchase souvenirs from the local vendors in Maubara. Tokodede is the main dialect with Indonesia and Tetum language are widely understood. It takes 20 to 30 minutes to reach Liquiça from Dili with personal vehicle or public one. The municipality has three post administrative: Bazartete, Maubara and Liquiça.

Pante Makassar beach. Oecusse, 2018

13. Oecusse – Administrative Region of Oecusse Ambeno

Oecusse is an enclave of Timor Leste located in Nusa Tenggara Timur province in Indonesia. As a coastal exclave, it located in the western part of the island of Timor. Oecusse is also popular with name Oecusse-Ambeno which are the names of the two original kingdoms existed before the colonial period. Oecusse also became the historical remarks of first Portuguese presence to Timor-Leste for sandalwood trade and this add more significant historical documentary for this municipality to be explored. The local cultural context also owns a unique patterns that add diversity to Timorese cultural heritage. When came here for the first time, what caught my eyes most was the beautiful sparkling blue beaches, the sharp-look mountains and its serenity in the city. Today one can travel to Oecusse by land and pass by Indonesian border in Atambua, by sea with Ferry (costs $8 USD per person) and by air with ZEEMS flight that cost $65 to $75 USD per seat from Dili. Oecusse today becomes the special administrtaion region in Timor-Leste and infrastructure are actively developed in the city of Pante Makassar. The municipality has 4 post administratives; Pante Makassar, Nitibe, Oesilo and Passabe. Baikenu is the local main dialect with Indonesian and Tetun language are widely understood.

There are still a lot to tell about how beautiful, unique and interesting from each of this municipalities.Somehow, mostly the road conditions today are under construction especially to eastern zone thus add difficulty to do a road trip to some of these municipalities. However, I believe there will be time when the conditions change and more exploration could be carried out to each of this municipalities.

Completion of My Visit to the 13 Municipalities of Timor-Leste (Part 2)

By: VZ from Dili, Timor-Leste.

A day at an old chapel, Ainaro villa, Ainaro, 2017

7. Ainaro – Ainaro Municipality

The word Ainaro is a derivative from the Mambae expression ai naru means ‘tall tree’. Ainaro municipality located in southwest part of the country, generally regarded as the coldest municipality in Timor-Leste due to it is located uphill and close to mount Ramelau, the tallest mountain in Timor-Leste. Ainaro is also known for its fertile land that actively produce vegetables, beans, flowers and coffee production by its farmers. My first time visit to Ainaro in 2018 last was realized during my return trip from Covalima to Dili. Along the way is full of green scenery view, landscape full of green hills, mountainous views, grass field and serene house along the street in Ainaro villa town. The city also has many Portuguese and Indonesian historical building remarks. Mambae is also one of main dialect spoken widely with Tetun and Indonesian language are widely understood. The municipalities also has interesting pattern of cultural traditions and historical places to explore especially as it becomes one of historical shelter during Timor-Leste resistant combatants during struggle of independence. The municipality has 4 post-administrative which are Ainaro vila, Hato-udo, Hato-builico and Maubisse. It took 3 to 4 hours to reach Ainaro from Dili and one has to pass by Aileu municipality beforehand.

Dom Boaventura Statue in Luak, Manufahi, 2017

8. Same -Manufahi Municipality

I first time visited this municipality in 2017 on a field trip and mesmerized by the beautiful scenery along the way there. Curvy roads, high steep hills, serene city, fresh cold air. Same is the capital of the municipality and the municipality name Manufahi according to local tales was modified version of the original word in Mambae ‘Maun Fahe‘ means brothers went apart according to local tale that once upon a time there were 5 brother who have to parting ways from their home. What fascinated me most about Same city is the story of Don Boaventura, a local king and regarded by most as hero for his resistance movement during The Great Rebelllion in 1910-1912 against Portuguese colonialism. The statue of Dom Boaventura located in a village named Luak, 20 minutes away from Same city. The city has interesting cultural and historical context to explore with local people. Mambae is also one of main dialect spoken widely with Tetun and Indonesian language are widely understood. The municipality has 4 post-administrative which are Same, Fatuberliu, Alas and Turiscai. It took around 8 to reach Same city from Dili and one will pass by Aileu municipality and Maubisse post-administrative of Aileu beforehand.

The chapel of Black September massacre in Suai, Covalima, 2018

9. Suai – Covalima Municipality

On my first visit to Suai city, I was very excited and intrigued to figure out the city and in particular to see the local chapel where the 1999 Black September massacre happened. It was one of the horrific story of massacre happened to Timorese civilians during the announcement of result of East Timor referendum in 1999. On my arrival, I rushed to see this place first and accompanied by a local guide from the hotel I stayed in. It is an old rustic chapel and some of the windows have been broken but inside was still functional to be used by local people to held catholic church activities. It was in this church that during the civil unrest, local people came to evacuate to this chapel that located uphill guided by four priests (three Timorese and one Indonesia priest) trying to protect them but local the militias came and shooting the civilians including the priests and burnt the chapel. Though the chapel was then renovated, its rustic look and serenity inside tells a lot of untold memories. Suai is one of post-administrative of Covalima Municipality and this municipality located in southwest part of the country.

The municipality borders the Timor Sea to the south, the municipality of Bobonaro to the north, Ainaro to the east, and the Indonesian province of Nusa Tenggara Timur to the west. Suai city located in coastal area and the weather is hot during the dry season. However, the Suai Loro beach was nearby and is beautiful to visit with precaution not to bath at the beach or go closer as there are warning of crocodile existence around the water. The sea around Suai is southern sea regarded by Timorese as Tasi Mane means male sea due its loud and resonance sea). The municipality has interesting cultural diversities in its tradition, local arts and beliefs.

The municipality has 6 post-administratives consisted of Fatululic, Fatumean, Fohorem, Zumalai, Maucatar, Suai, and Tilomar.  Tetun Terik, Kemak and Bunak are main dialect while Tetun and Indonesia are also widely uunderstood. Cova Lima municipality also regarded as the furthest municipality to reach from Dili as one has to pass by the curvy road of Aileu and Ainaro to reach Suai city during eight to nine hours trip with car or public trasnport from Dili. Nowaday, one can reach Suai city with ZEEMS flight (a CESSNA type plane) which costs $ 41 to $51 USD flies once a day from Monday to Saturday from Dili with duration of around 35 minutes. Suai has got a new airport build and planned to accommodate the petroleum and gas mining research and activity there. 

Timor Runguranga: A Gulliverian Travel of David Palazon as an Alice in Wonderland.

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“A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed.”
Ansel Adams

If there were a simple and practical way of time travelling around us today, then I would say that photography is one of it.

My first time encounter with David Palazon was back in 2013, at the office of the State Secretariat of Art and Culture (SSAC) in Villa Verde (today has moved to Praia dos Coqueiros Street), Dili,  when I was working with UNESCO Art and Culture Programme as  an administrative and programme assistant. At first sight, as a Timorese, I was a bit curious of David with his presence as a malae (foreigner in Tetum). Why does this malae willing to travel far away from Spain to Timor just to do all these fancy work of photography and all related stuff?

Before joining the UNESCO Art and Culture team, I used to think that art and culture is something fancy and has to be luxurious. But being introduced to David Palazon’s work as photographer and having the opportunity to witness his work with SSAC on the preservation programme of the tangible and intangible art and cultural heritage of Timor-Leste, made me realize the importance of art and culture documentation and preservation for Timor-Leste.

On doing his work of documenting the art and cultural events and objects in Timor-Leste through photography and videographical work, I saw that David’s passion and enthusiasm are painted in each of his work pieces.  In gathering all these artistic and meaningful documentation, David also engaged the Timorese fellows in a collaborative work and together each of them express their messages on each photographical work they have produced on how rich the Timor-Leste art and culture is. From that time, I start to believe that Timor-Leste is indeed a wonderful land of art and culture and I would always admire it and appreciate it as a Timorese.

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David Palazon (Stand in the middle from the first row behind) and his fellow source person friends of Timor Runguranga book.

However, despite being Timorese and one can say being the owner of all this Timorese richness of art and culture heritage, a question rose in mind, how can we continue to value and preserve these heritage of art of culture? How can we share the beauty of this value of Timor-Leste art and culture to our fellow Timorese and to the world around us? As Timorese, we may already carry out the role of valuing and preserving by maintaining the continuous practice of the heritage. On the other hand, in the context of Timor-Leste’s fluctuating development progress, more effort is necessary to encourage the act of valuing and preserving the Timor-Leste art and culture. One of these efforts, as I would concern, is to have the documentation. As without it, we would lose some significant things in life.

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Timor Runguranga is indeed has answered that concern of mine in a very artistic, satirical, mindful and yet heart-touching ways. When I received David’s invitation to attend the launching of the book in Timor Aid last year, I was kind of wondering, what exactly this photographical book would look like? The title word runguranga itself has caught my attention so much as it made think about messiness because runguranga as I understood it in Tetum, is everything related to messy and messiness. I had no idea why I pick up the book home only to keep it as collection and open a glimpse of it sometimes when I have a bit of free time. But once opening it, I start to promise myself that I have to go through the book and I did it at last.

After reading each page one by one, I laugh at myself on how I have underestimated this book. For me, looking at the pictures displayed inside it, has gave that sense of looking at the old family photo in a thick photo album. So nostalgic and emotional until you want to smile, laugh, frown and cry at the same time. Why? Because this book has captured how life has going on in Timor-Leste lately since its independence in 2000s. Within the decades, the runguranga essence that kept decorating the independence progress of Timor-Leste has brought us to learn many things as a new emerging country and that being runguranga has shaped us to grow along with the turmoil of the modern globalized world.

This book, being as a diary and memoir, has also capture the exchange of feelings as well as the exchange of collaboration between the insider and outsider who met in this small world of Timor-Leste and entwined them both in a world of rungurunga that only each of them can perceived when they were here. As some wise man has said; do not judge a book by its cover or do not judge people by its outer appearance then I would say do not judge a country if you have not been there. This book will confirm that saying with the collaborative work it displayed and the emotional sense each source person has shared.

This is why I found this book to be one of the inspiring photographic books I have ever seen. Apart of being a photo album, diary or memoir, this book, is also a fairytale storybook of Timor-Leste that one may share to their friends, family and children who would like to visit Timor-Leste or to see Timor-Leste in the past decades. I would also say that this book would be a collection of inspiration and motivation for me as a Timorese, to help advocate the art and culture preservation in Timor-Leste. As for the visitors who would like to know about Timor-Leste this book is very recommendable as an indirect tour guide.

To conclude, I would like to say that Timor Runguranga is the answer of my first impression quest to David himself which today I have called as maun (brother in Tetum) David, on why he is willing to travel  from far-far- away land of  Spain to Timor-Leste. By reflecting his Gulliverian journey throughout all territory of Timor-Leste in this book, I would call him ‘the male version of Alice in Wonderland’.

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To buy the book, please follow the link below:

http://www.blurb.com/b/7181097-timor-runguranga

Further infromation about David Palazon’s work can be found in this link:

https://davidpalazon.com/timor_runguranga/

ZV/VZ

I live in Dili and I love to read novels, watching movies, listen to beautiful musics and wrote things I found interesting.

Dili, 31 July 2017